Smell Function (Odor recognition) may be affected by Myotonic Dystrophy

Impaired smell found

A new study that looked at MRI images showed that there were some affects to smell that could be seen on patients MRI. It is very possible that some people affected with DM may have reduced or impaired Smell (odor responses). The study is in Japanese so this is all the information that we can report here.

[Impairment of Odor Recognition in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1].

[Article in Japanese]

Abstract

There is evidence that impaired human cognitive abilities are reflected in loss of olfactory abilities. Declining olfactory perception may be a biomarker for impairment of cognitive function and of impending illnesses in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Previously, we reported that patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1) had lower sensitivity to emotional facial expressions as well as abnormal olfactory threshold or recognition level. In DM 1, pathological studies have reported neurofibrillary tangles in several temporal areas including the entorhinal cortex (ENT), hippocampus (HI), and the amygdala. We observed that patients with DM 1 showed signal abnormalities in the olfactory limbic areas on magnetic resonance imaging. Our findings underscore the need to pay careful attention to significant decreases in odor identification abilities caused by diverse forms of abnormal brain function, especially in the AMG, ENT and HI.

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Draft report from the Muscular Dystrophy Coordinating Committee

The Muscular Dystrophy Coordinating Committee (MDCC)
MDCC is a government mandate to try and coordinate the research establish to coordinate activities to find cure, treatment and handling daily living of People with Muscular dystrophy : The Muscular Dystrophy Community Assistance, Research, and Education Amendments of 2001 (MD-CARE Act; P.L. 107-84) authorized the establishment of the MDCC, with members appointed by the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, in order to coordinate activities across the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and with other Federal health programs and activities relevant to the various forms of muscular dystrophy. The MDCC was subsequently re-authorized in the MD-CARE Acts of 2008 and 2014, with changes in its composition with each re-authorization.

Click Below for full copy of the Plan

MDCC Action Plan 2015 draft

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Review Article by Giovanni Meola Italy on Myotonic Dsytrophy Dec 2013

This is a review article by Giovanni Meola from Italy published in 2013. Click for link ==>Review Article Meola Dec 2013

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Causes of Death Myotonic Dystrophy – Survival to age 65 lower

This is an older study from 1998 but many folks ask about the longevity with this disease. How long will I live with myotonic dystrophy?

Age and causes of death in adult-onset myotonic dystrophy.

Brain

(1998) 121 (8): 1557-1563. doi: 10.1093/brain/121.8.1557

  1. C E de Die-Smulders,
  2. C J Höweler,
  3. C Thijs,
  4. J F Mirandolle,
  5. H B Anten,
  6. H J Smeets,
  7. K E Chandler and
  8. J P Geraedts

+ Author Affiliations


  1. Department of Clinical Genetics, Academic Hospital Maastricht, The Netherlands. christine.dedie@gen.unimaas.nl

Summary

Myotonic dystrophy is a relatively common type of muscular dystrophy, associated with a variety of systemic complications. Long term follow-up is difficult because of the slow progression. The objective of this study was to determine survival, age at death and causes of death in patients with the adult-onset type of myotonic dystrophy. A register of myotonic dystrophy patients was set up in Southern Limburg (the Netherlands), using data longitudinally collected over a 47-year period (1950-97). Survival for 180 patients (from the register) with adult-onset type myotonic dystrophy was established by the Kaplan-Meier method. The median survival was 60 years for males and 59 years for females. Survival of the patients was also estimated from the age of 15 years to the ages of 25, 45 and 65 years and compared with the expected survival of age- and sex-matched birth cohorts from the normal Dutch population. The observed survival to the ages of 25, 45 and 65 years was 99%, 88% and 18% compared with an expected survival of 99%, 95% and 78%, respectively. Thus, survival to the age of 65 in patients with adult-onset myotonic dystrophy is markedly reduced. A weak positive correlation between the CTG repeat length and younger age at death was found in the 13 patients studied (r = 0.50, P = 0.08). The cause of death could be determined in 70 of the 83 deceased patients. Pneumonia and cardiac arrhythmias were the most frequent primary causes of death, each occurring in approximately 30%, which was far more than expected for the general Dutch population. In addition, we assessed mobility in the years before death in a subgroup of 18 patients, as a reflection of the long-term physical handicap in myotonic dystrophy patients. Half of the patients studied were either partially or totally wheelchair-bound shortly before their death.

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Myotonic Dystrophy Becomes G71-11 on October 1, 2014

2013 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code G71.11

Myotonic muscular dystrophy

  • G71.11 is a billable ICD-10-CM code that can be used to specify a diagnosis.
  • On October 1, 2014 ICD-10-CM will replace ICD-9-CM in the United States, therefore, G71.11 and all ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes should only be used for training or planning purposes until then.
Applicable To

  • Dystrophia myotonica [Steinert]
  • Myotonia atrophica
  • Myotonic dystrophy
  • Proximal myotonic myopathy (PROMM)
  • Steinert disease
ICD-10-CM G71.11 is part of Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v28.0):

  • 091 Other disorders of nervous system with mcc
  • 092 Other disorders of nervous system with cc
  • 093 Other disorders of nervous system without cc/mcc
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