General Information on DM1

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This is a diagram or the major effects of Myotonic Dystrophy on the Human. Click to enlarge

The Blog. You’ve reached this site as you may be the one of nearly one million people affected by Myotonic Dystrophy  Worldwide. This site aggregates and publishes all information on Myotonic Dystrophy Myotonic Dystrophy is a disease that is genetically based and inherited from one generation to the next. One out of two children of a person  with myotonic dystrophy will most likely have  the disease. Unlike most diseases, the symptoms that a person with this disease varies from person to person. Some people are just mildly affected others are severely affected. This makes it hard to tell you exactly how the disease will affect a particular person.

Four treatments that have potential have now surfaced about Myotonic Dystrophy. These are three approved Drugs by FDA and “off label use” may assist some people with DM1. (As always check with your Doctor) . The other is a drug that is not FDA approved in the USA for human use. Three off label uses have showed promise in mice studies but as yet there is no human data… In January of 2017 Ionis Pharmaceuticals stopped the trials of its DMPK-2.5Rx drug as it failed to show promise in the human trials.

====> Erythromycin study in cells and mice successfully pushes back disease in Mice
====> Actinomycin D study in cells and mice successfully pushes back disease in Mice
====> Phenylbutazone Ketoprofen  Study in cells and mice pushes back disease in mice. NSAID type drugs. Ketoprofen would be strongly preferred.

NOTE: These potential treatments are just that potential. NO studies in humans have been completed and reported. However, more and more information is available and hereat this si you will find all that is published. You and your doctor should discuss these if you feel it warranted.

Myotonic dystrophy is a rare disease with an incidence of about one in 8000 in European and North American Populations. The incidence in Japan is approximately 1 in 20,000. In Africa and China the incidence is much lower.  The incidence of the congenital form of myotonic dystrophy  is much lower with an incidence of 1/100,000. A more recent study by Campbell in Canada put the incidence of the congenital form at 1/47,000 That means that most doctors will not have a patient with the disease in their practice. Thus, many people are turning to organizations like the Myotonic Dystrophy Foundation for help and assistance.

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Common Antibiotic Might Help Treat Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 – Promising Therapy

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In a study published in December 2015 in a peer review journal researchers from Japan and Poland found that a commonly used antibiotic might assist in the treatment of Myotonic Dystrophy. This is a sort of stunning discovery as there is no treatment identified to treat the disease. Treatment now consists of reducing symptoms.

The researchers first began by screening antibiotics. In a screen of 20 antibiotics 2-3 were found to have some potential with the disease.When screening the drugs they first used mice cells and lab equipment to find the most promising compounds (drugs). . Erythromyicin was found to have the highest attraction to the RNA CUG expansion (The opposite of CTG repeats in the DNA) Erythromycin was the drug that the researchers chose to study. Click here for the screening graph Muscleblind and Various antibiotics and compounds

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- Gathering for Myotonic Dystrophy Researchers

Today Sept 5th marks the opening of the IDMC-11 conference. This is the 11th time that the scientific community comes together to discuss the advances in the myotonic dystrophy field. The scientists share information about advances in the all stages of the disease from the molecular basis to drug development. Watch here for updates and summaries from the conference. Today is registration and the keynote address. The conference this year is in San Francisco, CA USA.

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New Dental Case Study shows benefits of Dental Care for Young adult

Dental issues loom large in myotonic dystrophy. Structural issues with teeth and gums. Lack of physical strength to properly clean teeth are a number of the issues that come up. Here is a recent case study of a young adult with DM1 that shows with extensive work a good outcome can occur. Here is the abstract:

Surgical Orthodontic Treatment of a Patient Affected by Type 1 Myotonic Dystrophy (Steinert Syndrome).

Abstract

Myotonic dystrophy, or Steinert’s disease, is the most common form of muscular dystrophy that occurs in adults. This multisystemic form involves the skeletal muscles but affects also the eye, the endocrine system, the central nervous system, and the cardiac system. The weakness of the facial muscles causes a characteristic facial appearance frequently associated with malocclusions. Young people with myotonic dystrophy, who also have severe malocclusions, have bad oral functions such as chewing, breathing, and phonation. We present a case report of a 15-year-old boy with anterior open bite, upper and lower dental crowding, bilateral crossbite, and constriction of the upper jaw with a high and narrow palate. The patient’s need was to improve his quality of life. Because of the severity of skeletal malocclusion, it was necessary to schedule a combined orthodontic and surgical therapy in order to achieve the highest aesthetic and functional result. Although therapy caused an improvement in patient’s quality of life, the clinical management of the case was hard. The article shows a balance between costs and benefits of a therapy that challenges the nature of the main problem of the patient, and it is useful to identify the most appropriate course of treatment for similar cases.

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Long Distance Marathoning with Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2

A Recent  case study just published examined a person with a mild case of myotonic Dystrophy type 2 PROMM. This individual was a long distance marathon runner. The disease did not interference with the sport that the individual chose. Additionally, the doctors proposed that the heavy excercise may have helped to retard the progression of the disease.

“In conclusion, this case shows that PROMM may take a
mild course over at least 22 years, that PROMM with mild
myotonia may allow a patient to continue strenuous sport
activity, and that continuous physical activity may contribute
to the mild course of PROMM. The genotype/phenotype
correlation between the CCTG-expansion and the mild phenotype
is weak.

FULL STUDY can be seen at this link

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Ionis Pharmaceuticals Pursuing More Potent Myotonic Dystrophy Drug

Recent information came to light that Ionis is still continuing pursue a drug for myotonic dystrophy. The first trial ended and was not successful. What we learned is that the team was impressed that progress was made. Rather than pursue this initial drug they may be switching to a new more highly improved drug. This makes sense as the cost to pursue a drug is high $$$$ and you want your best candidate forward.

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International Scientist meeting of Myotonic Dystrophy Researchers in San Francisco Sept 5-9 2017

The IDMC meeting will be in San Fransisco this year. Make plans to attend the scientific sessions  or the meeting of the Myotonic Dystrophy foundation

Please save September 5th – 9th, 2017 for the IDMC-11 conference being held in San Francisco, California. If you are interested in receiving updates about IDMC-11, please sign up online at www.idmc11.org.

IDMC 11

Welcome to the IDMC website, home of the International Myotonic Dystrophy Consortium (IDMC, or International Dystrophia Myotonica Consortia). This site is dedicated to the community of scientists, physicians and health care providers who have taken up the fight against Myotonic Dystrophy, a progressive neuromuscular disease that effects people and families around the world.

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